Thoughts

Research

Liminality and Polarisation

Substack Anecdotally, my early and initial reaction to Jude Ellison S. Doyle’s newsletter about Substack, and Hamish McKenzie’s prompt sub-tweet response seems to have proved correct. Since then, a substantial amount of the people whose newsletters I look forward to receiving each week (or thereabouts) have left the platform or are debating how to do …

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HeiNous

Discourse, Donations, and a Good Acronym

Happening, Reflecting I appreciated Nick Hillman’s blog post, “Higher Education in Medialand“, based on his comments made at the 200th seminar of the Centre for Global Higher Education. Worth reading for some interesting views on how the media approach Higher Education stories, and also for his pertinent observation about the limitations of social media as …

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#AsSheFlies Scrapbook

ASF014 Show Your Working

Winter was for taking a step back and considering. Spring is for action. My digital streamlining continues, but it continues at a reasonable pace and comfortable in the knowledge that it remains a work in progress. The older I get, the more I realise how much I enjoy showing my working. I used to obsess …

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Research

Limitations of Digital Places

Scribbles in my Research notebook, Monday 29th March 2021: observations and writing I have found interesting in the last week. Digital Places Scaachi Koul, writing for Buzzfeed News, discusses a year spent mostly online, and highlights what I suspect many will agree are limitations of what digital places can provide. Obviously this last year has …

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HeiNous

Decolonisation and Boundaries

Scribbles in my HeiNous notebook, Friday 26th March 2021: observations and writing I have found interesting in the last week. Happening, Reflecting I’d strongly recommend everyone read this week’s HEPI blog post, “Blaming decolonisation for limiting free speech is a red herring“, by Sylvie Lomer, Parise Carmichael-Murphy and Jenna Mittelmeier: not just for a helpful …

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HeiNous

Learning from the Folklore of Higher Education

My original presentation upon which this and the previous four posts have been based began with an introduction to my own academic, personal, and professional background, and ended by drawing together some of the key themes discussed with reference to these introductory facts. Much of that wouldn’t have translated well to a blog post format …

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